Tag Archives: cardio

Why Women Need Rebounders

NASA found rebounding to be 68% more oxygen efficient than other exercises. This means that using a rebounder uses oxygen more efficiently so you still get the cardiovascular benefits of without feeling as tired and out of breath as you would if you were doing other aerobic exercises. It is a very effective cardio activity; however, I completely underestimated the rebounder and its health benefits. As it turns out, rebounding is considered to be the most effective form of exercise because of numerous health gains, including detoxification, injury prevention, and the reversal of osteoporosis, in comparison to running and other high impact activities.

Detoxification

One of the major advantages of using a rebounder is its effects on the lymphatic system. Lymph helps keep bodily fluid levels balanced, as well as fight infection by removing disease-causing germs. This lymph is able to move throughout the body only by a person performing physical activity. Without exercise, the lymph is unable to remove any harmful waste and causes degenerative diseases, such as arthritis, as well as forms of cancer. The up-and-down motion of rebounding can increase lymphatic flow by 15-30 times the normal pace (healingdaily.com) which will have a huge effect on the improvement of your immune system.

Injury prevention

The low impact exercise of the rebounder takes the unnecessary stress off of your joints, especially your ankles and knees. Shin splints are also a major cause of injury to those participating in high impact activities. Joint damage and shin splints caused by excessive stress are completely preventable if running or jogging on hard surfaces is replaced by rebounding or another low impact activity.

Osteoporosis

Not only does rebounding increase the circulation of lymph fluid and prevent arthritis, but studies have found that bone mass can actually increase as well. This finding is especially important to women who gradually lose bone mass as they age and osteoporosis sets in. Even for those who have already been diagnosed with osteoporosis, rebounding can reverse the effects and damage of this condition.

Other benefits of rebounding exercise include increased balance, improved blood pressure and cholesterol levels, prevention of the common cold and sore throat, and even a natural face lift!

Rebounders are relatively inexpensive and can be found at most sports equipment stores and websites. I recommend doing some research to find one that fits your budget and personal needs. There are also websites and DVDs available of specific exercises and programs that will help you incorporate rebounding into your workout routine.

Liven Up Your Interval Training

Interval training is a great way to up the ante on your cardio routines.  But what happens when even your interval training is getting stale?  Is that possible?  Intervals can be quite intense anyway, but sure, it’s definitely possible to get bored even of HIIT (stands for “high intensity interval training”).

So, how do you crank up your intervals?  Or at least get some interval training in that doesn’t feel like the ‘same old, same old’.

Intervals don’t have to be limited to just running but if running is your sport of choice, you can incorporate different kinds of intervals into your training.  Try finding a big hill and doing hillsprints, or finding a sandy beach and doing your sprint training in the unstable sand or better yet, the resistance by adding waves.  Or you can find a big field and sprint to one end and do a slow jog back to the other side (and repeat ).

BUT, if you’re looking to liven it up with different kinds of intervals besides running, then there’s also lots you can do.  Intervals can be done with almost every kind of cardio exercise imaginable.

Hop on your mountain bike and find a good hilly trail to cycle.  Hills add intervals to your training naturally.  Every up hill is your work interval and every trip down is your rest interval.  You don’t even have to time it.  Just keep finding hills and giving it your all on every trip up.

I have a little trick when I’m short on time and need a quick interval workout without leaving home.  Luckily I live in a highrise building in the city with a huge stairwell, so I head to the bottom of the stairwell and climb 20 stories as my work interval, until I hit the top.  Then I punch the elevator button and take a quick ride to the bottom as my rest interval and hit that stairwell again for another work interval climbing to the top.  Eight times doing this takes me 45 minutes and it’s a heck of a great workout.  It works my glutes, hip flexors, quads, hamstrings, and calves thoroughly and gives my cardiovascular system a major boost in the process.

Another cool alternative for Interval Training is to SWIM it out!  Yes, you can do interval training swimming too.  And, believe it or not, there’s lots of ways to ‘time’ your intervals when you’re underwater.  A cool gadget that’s available now is an underwater mp3 player and there are lots of different brands making these now.  So you can either load in a timed interval mp3 and use that to time your swim intervals or just pick a few songs that have a definite ‘chorus’ and ‘non-chorus’ parts to the songs and swim hard for the chorus and swim easy for the non-chorus parts.

Or, if you don’t have the budget for a swimming mp3 player, just time your intervals by counting your strokes.  Swim hard for 50 strokes and easy for 50 strokes.  Or change your strokes.  Swim hard for 50 meters of front crawl and 50 meters of breast stroke at a slower pace.  This is easier to accomplish in a swimming pool where you hit the wall and turn around for the next 50 meters (for example).  If you’re in a lake or ocean you might try swimming from buoy to buoy.

Another great and extremely easy way to do intervals that you can also do pretty much anywhere is to make sure you’ve got a jump rope with you and just start jumping.  Jump at regular pace for your rest interval and double pace for your work interval.  Count turns of the rope to time it out.  100 fast jumps for the work interval, 50 slow jumps for rest interval.

There ya go.  Interval options to keep you interested and motivated with your interval training for weeks to come. Enjoy the benefits you’re sure to see from all your hard work.

And don’t forget to have fun.

Robert Martin